Turfgrass Science News

By Jon Trappe

Many plant enthusiasts have observed difficulty planting some plant species around black walnut trees.  Black walnut trees naturally excrete chemicals into their environment to make themselves more competitive.  This negative plant-on-plant interaction is known as allelopathy, and is more common in multiple plant species than was once previously thought. 

There have been a few reports (Bertin et al., 2009; Bertin et al., 2003) of natural weed suppression in certain fine fescues (Festuca spp.).

Monday, December 11, 2017 - 9:00am

By David R. Herrera

NASA scientist Cristina Milesi estimates that there is three times the amount of turfgrass in the United States as there are acres of irrigated corn [1]. When we consider that the rate of grass seed density required for turf can be up to 6 lbs per 1000 sq.ft, one can imagine the enormous quantity of seed needed to plant all that turf! Most of that planted grass seed is, at least here in the Midwest, Kentucky bluegrass. However, there is a grass genus that has gained interest and may one day be used just as much or more as Kentucky bluegrass.

Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 10:45am

Did you know that many Minnesotans with irrigation systems over-water their lawns?  University of Minnesota Extension and the Metropolitan Council have created a new educational video on home irrigation efficiency that illustrates how homeowners can save water, while still having a great-looking lawn. 

Monday, December 4, 2017 - 10:30am

By Parker Anderson, Research Scientist, Science of the Green Initiative, University of Minnesota

Recently, the Science of the Green Initiative at the University of Minnesota, in partnership with the United States Golf Association (USGA), collected data on golf pace of play to examine the impacts of green speed on pace of play at seven golf courses of differing characteristics around the United States. The implications of the data collected, however, are far greater than just measuring the time each player spent on the putting greens; the results have additional value regarding golf facility sustainability and productivity.

Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 1:15pm

By Parker Anderson, Research Scientist, Science of the Green Initiative, University of Minnesota

In May of 2017, to address the challenges the golf industry faces, the United States Golf Association laid out their “Road Map to 2025” which sets the goals of improving golfer satisfaction by 20% while reducing critical resource consumption by 25% by 2025 (USGA, 2017b). Golf industry trends indicate that more golf courses are closing than are being opened, management costs are increasing, participation rates are flat or declining, and consumer behavior is changing (Licata and Tiger, 2010; NGF, 2017). It is critically important for golf course managers to identify factors that prevent golfers from participating in the game (Petrick, 2001).

Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - 10:45am

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What is Turfgrass Science?

The University of Minnesota's Turfgrass Science Program conducts field-based research and offers education and consultation to both commercial turfgrass managers and homeowners caring for their yards.

For turfgrass or home lawn questions, contact:

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For questions related to turfgrass extension, contact:

Sam Bauer, Extension Educator
sjbauer@umn.edu or 612-626-3085
Sam Bauer

Dr. Brian Horgan, Professor
bphorgan@umn.edu or 612-624-0782
Dr. Brian Horgan

For degree questions, contact:

Dr. Eric Watkins, Professor
ewatkins@umn.edu or 612-624-7496
Dr. Eric Watkins