Fine fescue

September 21, 2017

Fine fescue turfgrass species are excellent alternatives to provide functional turf areas while reducing inputs of water, fertilizer, mowing, and pesticides.  Eric Watkins recently received a $5.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture to identify ways to facilitate adoption of these fine fescues on private and public landscapes.

September 18, 2017

By Dominic Petrella

Before I came to the University of Minnesota I had never actually seen a fine fescue golf green in person.  I’ve always had the impression that fine fescue species could only produce a suitable greens surface in climates similar to Ireland, the U.K., or the Pacific Northwest of the U.S.  Recent research, however, is helping me to realize that fine fescues could be suitable for golf greens in Minnesota (or similar Midwest locations) that want a lower input option.

September 19, 2016

By: Jonah Reyes, Research Scientist

Image 1: 12” Drip line above MNST-12 sod and seed.
Image 1: 12” Drip line above MNST-12 sod and seed. (Photo: Jonah Reyes)

January 8, 2016

The 2015 Cultivar Evaluation Results are now available and published online.  To view these results, click the “Cultivar Evaluation Results” tab under the Research section on the left of this webpage.  Clicking this link will initially bring you to the 2015 data page, but you can view archived data from 2007-2013 as well.

August 3, 2015

Previously I wrote about the different renovation options for fall seeding of lawns and about the various attributes of cool-season lawn grasses.  This week I wanted to discuss the mixtures and blends of grass seed that are on the consumer marketplace.  If you’ve ever walked into your local big box store or garden center looking for grass seed, the different products available can be fairly int

January 26, 2015

The 2014 Cultivar Evaluation Results are now available and published online.  To view these results, click the “Cultivar Evaluation Results” tab under the Research section on the left of this webpage.

September 11, 2014

By Maggie Reiter, Graduate Research Assistant

Rainout shelter on the St. Paul campus
Rainout shelter on the St. Paul campus. Photo: Maggie Reiter

September 2, 2014

Pamela Rice, Research Chemist and Adjunct Professor, USDA-Agricultural Research Service and Department of Soil, Water and Climate

Brian Horgan, Professor, Department of Horticultural Sciences

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